welcoming smile shattered like glass beneath my foot

I’m so selfish and sorry, I love you so much

the world through rose tinted glasses  (at Good News Cafe)

the world through rose tinted glasses (at Good News Cafe)

Grieves

Grieves

everyone that played last night was good, but sadistik honestly floored me. beyond dope, what a great set

everyone that played last night was good, but sadistik honestly floored me. beyond dope, what a great set

hello all, 

I’m very excited about a new project I’m starting, which I coined “Gluten-Free”. please check it out here and throw me a follow if you can

It’s going to be a hip hop music/show/photography blog. enjoy!

flea market swag

flea market swag

everyone that played last night was good, but sadistik honestly floored me. beyond dope, what a great set

everyone that played last night was good, but sadistik honestly floored me. beyond dope, what a great set

requisite pre-show selfie #amped

requisite pre-show selfie #amped

play fighting with andrew is literally my favorite thing to do

we also have pears

we also have pears

blackberries in my backyard

blackberries in my backyard

fresh veggies forever

fresh veggies forever

My Journalism 300 professor was excited about this short article I wrote about New Haven for one of our bi-weekly assignments, (I thought the class was kicking my ass so the encouragement definitely put a smile on my face). I figured I’d share what I wrote!

New Haven, Connecticut is a study in contradictions. Sprawling brownstone mansion-cum-dorm rooms are just minutes away from graffiti ridden slums. Groomed green areas complete with benches and two formidably sized churches border streets on which you’d question the safety of walking at night. One might argue that you need some dark to see the light, and New Haven’s balanced possession of both have carved out a permanent place for the city in my heart. 
Whalley Avenue is quintessential New Haven. The street has humble beginnings; mostly car dealerships, a planet fitness. A Goodwill that has supplied most of my wardrobe over the years (a lot of glitzy 80’s goes 20’s beaded blouses), and a run down Sam Ash music store where I used to pick up strings for my cello. A bit further down, my first workplace: Odeon, a small upscale women’s boutique. While sorting through designer clothes, I was once warned by neighbors that break ins were happening in the area involving a man threatening customers with a handful of open medical syringes. Moving on we sweep past a halfway house I volunteered at. I remember my boss sweating like a woozy marshmallow under the fluorescent lights. He’d read to our inattentive class while playing dated, uplifting oldies. The experience was not unlike the scene in Reservoir Dogs where Mr. Blonde cuts off a cop’s ear while listening to “Super Sounds”. 
Moving on, we reach the heart of New Haven, where Yale’s campus dominates. We make two rights to pass the New Haven Green onto Chapel street, to get a bite to eat at Claire’s Cornucopia. Or alternately we might keep going straight, onto Audubon Street for some coffee at Koffee, and then onto the dodgier State Street, to take the train to New York City. 
The population of New Haven is 130,660, and the average age is 29. This age is much lower than the Connecticut average, which is 40. The per capita income of New Haven is $23,026. 8,538 households receive Food Stamps/SNAP. The majority of New Haven residents (21,484) are in management, business, science, and arts occupations. 
The New Haven area was originally settled by the Quinnipiack Native Americans. It became New Haven “when Reverend John Davenport and Theophilus Eaton, a wealthy London merchant, sailed into the harbor” (City of New Haven). These two European Imperialists sought to create a “Christian Utopia”, and a profitable commercial empire. Resultantly, as one my guess, New Haven’s economy was based of trade. New Haven supports a vibrant art community, and the bustling, youthful nature of downtown indicates it is on the upswing. This light, profitable side of New Haven is tempered by its high crime and poverty rates. It also contends with a 16 percent unemployment rate. A less serious though equally irksome issue is New Haven’s notorious traffic problems.